Tuesday, 2 September 2014

The King Family

Bringing the weight of Southampton Hospital, Hampshire Police and the Spanish authorities to bear on a loving family desperate to save the life of their little boy, to isolate him from his family and to handcuff and detain his parents fills me with dismay and anger. This is a despicable way to treat decent people and contrasts sharply with the sickening betrayal and neglect of those 1400 youngsters in Rotherham. It's disgraceful to see soft targets bullied and coerced while awkward, belligerent ones are given an easy ride.
This has become a distorted, twisted country with warped values as, once again, we see a legal instrument, the European Arrest Warrant, sold to us on the pretext that it will bring criminals such as gangsters, terrorists and sex offenders to justice, being used instead to attack the law abiding and respectable. If this sort of nightmare can happen to the King family, it can happen to any of us.

Saturday, 30 August 2014

Rotherham Child Abuse Scandal

I have heard very little as to what is being done to help the 1400+ children who were abused. They have been severely traumatised and their lives shattered. Where is the mass publicity advising them of where they can get help? They should be the number one priority, sorting out and punishing those perpetrated the crimes and those who allowed them to happen can come tomorrow. Today we need to help the abused.
Napac - the National Association for People Abused in Childhood is one charity - 0808 801 0331 is the helpline.

Friday, 15 August 2014

Thought for the day

If Catholics only have mass on Sundays do they cease to exist the rest of the week?

Tuesday, 12 August 2014

How on earth did we manage?

It seems that our esteemed politicians cannot survive on less than £120k per year in London. I wonder how Julia and I managed on far less than that?
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/aug/11/tory-foreign-office-minister-quits-intolerable-expenses-rules

Sunday, 3 August 2014

Reflection for Sunday 3 August - Feeding of the 5000

Thanks to Fr Robin Gibbons for this:

What does it mean for a Christian in fear of their life in Iraq, a Syrian Christian bombed out of home and church or a child whose whose family has been blown to bits in Gaza or somebody with the Ebola virus, to hear those words of Paul, ‘nothing can separate us from the love of Christ?’.  Would they find comfort in a pain beyond words, in a loss we can only vaguely acknowledge.
This is where pious platitudes and sentimental religion collapse, this is the point where the Christ of salvation loses his clothes and church finery, moves out of a safe sacramental world we create and becomes the bloodied Christ of the cross. The one who cries ‘ father forgive, they know not what they do!'.This is the point where the raw love of God remains our hope!
We are all complicit in the savagery of this world, we in the West have it so easy, but that cannot last.  If we follow the Lord the cross is ours to carry and transformation comes through bearing one another’s burdens.  Jesus in the Gospel sees the crowd and takes pity on them, but before he celebrates a meal with them he is active in curing the sick.  A message for us who have weekly Eucharist, that the beginning of our sacramental celebration lies with the care of real people, there the body of Christ is first encountered.  The needs of the poor, hungry, homeless come before our need for sacramental celebration which connects with our active love.
Isaiah shows us God literally calling people from want and need to life, but that, on this earth has to be through us! The scriptures are not simply pages in a book or nice poetic readings, they are God’s voice calling us to respond now!
But back to my initial question, how do people who have had far more suffering than we ever will know, who in a true sense take on sufferings far more painful than the Christ on the cross, find that love of God?
As I grow older I notice more that in the tangled mess and problems of the world, there is one thread that never snaps, somehow deep in all of this is the presence of Christ alive, loving, suffering with them.  The presence of that loving Christ is our constant loving care for these little ones!

Friday, 25 July 2014

Graduation Day (and 43 Wedding Anniversary)

At last all my studies have come to an close. Yesterday (Thursday 24 July) was graduation day at Westminster Cathedral. They said that it was 300 degrees, I am not sure if that was the number graduating or the temperature inside the Cathedral. Anyway it was a great day.
After the ceremony Julia and I went with Andrew and gaew to Gymkhana, an upmarket Indian restaurant in Albermerle Street. It was a fantastic meal, subtle twist on traditional Indian food. It is not cheap, but we dined off the early evening menu which made it affordable (just). We had the matching wines and they really did go well with each dish. Highly recommended!





Surrounded by young ladies!


With the love of my life

With John Hamilton - a fellow deacon